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Dan Brown’s the Lost Symbol

lostsymbolLast night I finished reading Dan Brown’s latest. One of the longest books I’ve read in a while, but that’s more of a slur on my book reading habits than the book itself.

I’ve read all four of Dan Brown’s other books, and enjoyed each one. Angels & Demons being my favourite, closely followed by The Davinci Code. One thing I noticed during the previous for books, was there was a pattern shared between them all. A serious problem followed by a string of clues, codes or events that would get in the way, not always overcome, but resulting in a relatively happy ending. I think the lost Symbol throws in some surprises.

When your reading the first half of the book, you set expectations on what you think the ending of the book will revolve around. My initial expectations were were quickly resolved by half way through the book. At the half way point, the book takes a turn to tradition. Clues, puzzles and codes all with a pressing time limit and lives hanging in the balance. Even an ongoing hint at imminent global ramifications.

As usual Brown takes commonly known scientific theories, buildings and historical facts and adds his own twists, intertwining reality with the story he’s trying to tell. Every element of science and history in the book has a bedding in fact. Each claim made, justified and backed up enough for any layman reader, including myself, agree that it is plausible in the context of the story.

The final part of the book brings all the parts of the book into context and answers all the questions that were previously left hanging. The end reveals what man kind has been searching for all their lives with a magical reveal that is conceivable and humbling.

I’m sure some people will find truths in Brown’s book as they did in the Da Vinci code and that, when, not if, the film of this book is made it will be a great film.

Well worth the read!

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